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Nov 28-Dec 1, 2016, Denver

Call for Abstracts - Tracks

The Technical Sessions will consist of four-five concurrent tracks. Government, Industry, and Academia are encouraged to participate. Please click on the track topics listed below to thoroughly review the requirements of each track, and determine which track the abstract or panel proposal best fits. Please be sure to submit abstracts and/or panel proposals within the appropriate track using the links below. Abstracts and panel proposals should be 200-500 words in length. Do not attempt to submit abstracts or panel proposals through any other means. Submitted abstracts will be rated based on clarity, value added to the conference, and how well the topic fits within the track. Abstracts should be public releasable and contain no proprietary information. Please note that the conference planning team may determine that an abstract or panel proposal best sfits in a track other that what was originally selected by the author.

Listed below are the tracks for more detailed information.

The increasing budgetary pressures due to the effects of DMSMS coupled with the combined effects of life extension of defense platforms, delays in development of new defense systems, as well as cancellation of new programs, systems and platforms further underlines the need for and demands efforts to strengthen the role of organic manufacturing and repair capabilities operated by and for the Department of Defense.  This increases the need for reliance on the organic industrial base (OIB) to be instrumental in DMSMS solutions including manufacture, repair, and modification of the associated systems and platforms to handle the specific needs of the current and future missions.

Abstracts are requested for this topic that describe and document many of the associated successes and challenges faced by the OIB in providing DMSMS solutions, including, but not limited to:

  • One of a kind organic capabilities such as parts reclamation, overhaul, modification, and testing
  • Agile and quick response solutions effected by organic facilities in the effort to maintain and improve readiness
  • Schedule improvements achieved with the involvement of the OIB
  • Cost savings achieved in the use of the OIB
  • Teaming of industry and the OIB to obtain DMSMS solutions
  • Modernization efforts conducted by the OIB
  • Adaptation of business practices, including Lean Six Sigma and benchmarking to improve OIB quality, reduce cost, and/or improve schedule
  • Improvements in processes and capacity to meet expanding demand
  • Use of an enterprise resource plan (ERP) to effect improvement in OIB operations
  • Use of metrics to drive continuous improvement
  • Cultural challenges overcome in the quest for continuous improvement by the OIB
  • Challenges in organizational communication
  • Any relevant combination of the above listed topics
If you wish to submit a training proposal, please review the tracks and determine the best fit for your proposed training. The committee realizes that the training sessions may require schedule adjustments for time and the training session chair will contact you to obtain your desired agenda and length of time needed to complete the training. Please indicate the track topic that best fits your training and use the separate drop down option that states "Training" for your submittal.
The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and its Enterprise Business System (EBS) continues to enhance customer support. Through modernization and Continuous Process Improvement (CPI) projects, DLA is providing more materials and services around the world faster, cheaper and with more accuracy than ever before. There is, however, always the need to ensure that DLA’s customers understand the processes and interfaces needed to conduct day to day business. This track will provide the opportunity to learn about and discuss processes such as the DLA Form 339, how and why it’s used. Under EBS, the Customer Requirements Manager (CRM) is the interface that will help ensure your long term requirements are planned and fulfilled. The Federal Logistics Information Service (FLIS) is responsible for the Federal Supply System, National Stock Numbers (NSNs), cataloging and much more. This track is expecting presentation abstracts that will help you understand and utilize DLA more efficiently and show the benefits of successful collaborations between DLA and its many customers.
The "R&D in DMSMS Management and Solutions" Technical Session will cover new and evolving technologies and advancements available to DMSMS practitioners' to leverage in implementing DMSMS solutions. Topics include but are not limited to: metals Additive Manufacturing for sustainment and obsolescence hardware manufacturing, new prototyping advancements in polymeric materials, printed sand molds and cores for short run sand casting production, new technologies for Reverse Engineering mechanical and creating 3D models, advanced IC electronic obsolescence replacement strategies, new rapid tooling/fixtures production methodologies and technologies for Reverse Engineering electronic components such as IC's and other electronic components. This Technical Session will present these new advancements providing descriptions of the technologies and also practical examples of each technologies' use in solving DMSMS issues."

The DoD Parts Management Program is an integral part of the acquisition process for design, development, modification and sustainment of weapons systems and equipment. An effective parts management program provides the ultimate user, the warfighter, better solutions that can be measured through the desired performance-based criteria of operational availability, operational reliability, and cost per unit usage, logistics footprint and logistics response time as well as payback in terms of reduced total ownership costs.

Parts Management focuses on selecting the best parts at the design phase of an acquisition program, as well as managing parts-specific issues throughout the program lifecycle, under an overarching Systems Engineering umbrella. Parts are the building blocks from which systems are created and, as such, greatly impact hardware performance and readiness. The reliability, maintainability, and supportability of the end item are dependent upon these parts. Today’s acquisition environment is characterized by rapid design evolution, increased use of commercial part types, global supply chain partners, and DMSMS issues. The need for programs and contractors to have an effective Parts Management Program is greater than ever before.

This track will provide a forum for individuals to discuss processes, methods, best practices, lessons learned, case studies, and success stories related to Parts Management concepts. Presentations are welcomed from any individual with experience using systems engineering concepts to ensure long-term system supportability.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Parts Management Requirements, Policies, Standards, and Practices
  • Development of Parts Management Plans
  • Synergy of Systems Engineering and Parts Management
  • The Role of Parts Management in Design
  • Coordination of Parts Management Issues within or between Services or Agencies
  • Obsolescence Management as an Element of Parts Management
  • Tools and Processes Supporting Parts Management (Electrical and/or Mechanical)
  • DoD-Industry Partnerships for Parts Management (Electrical and/or Mechanical)
  • Value-Added Examples of Parts Management within the DoD
  • Commercial Parts Management Programs/Systems
  • Parts Management with Coalition Partners
  • Automated Parts Management Systems across the Lifecycle
  • Innovative Parts Management Practices
  • Parts Standardization & Management Committee (PSMC)
  • The Benefits of Parts Management:  Parts Management Resources and Program Metrics
  • Implementation (or Verification) of PM&P (Parts, Materials and Processes) Requirements when Integrating COTS Electronic Assemblies
  • Parts Management Success Stories and Lessons Learned
Supply risk involves those issues which jeopardize the ability of the Department of Defense (DoD) organizations to supply or support the warfighter in CONUS or Theatre-of-Operations abroad with the correct parts or materials, in the necessary quantities, when required. Some of these risks involve problems with cyber security, counterfeit parts, loss of manufacturing capability and raw materials, material distribution, material management, asset visibility, and many other related problems. These are many of the same issues that drive the Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages (DMSMS) problem. This track encourages presentations and discussions related to Supply Chain Risk Management (SCRM) processes used by the services, program offices, supply agencies, and others in resolving or controlling the plethora of issues known as supply risk and DMSMS as a supply risk issue.

Proactive planning, process implementation, part monitoring, data analysis, and resolution implementation are all necessary to mitigate the impacts of DMSMS and obsolescence in efforts to reduce TLCM costs. This track will discuss best practices in these areas.

Presentations are sought from individuals who are DMSMS subject matter experts knowledgeable in planning and execution of proactive DMSMS management, individuals who are users or providers within the government or industrial base who participate in any aspect of legacy system supply, and individuals within the government or industrial base who participate in any aspect of the microelectronics supply chain or the materials supply chain.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to the following:

  • DMSMS Management Planning
  • DMSMS Program Implementation
  • Parts Research, Monitoring, and Surveillance
  • Designing for Supportability
  • Software Obsolescence Considerations
  • DMSMS Program Infrastructure
  • Impact Assessments
  • Resolution Determination and Implementation
  • Developing workforce DMSMS competencies
  • DMSMS and Engineering Technical Reviews
  • DMSMS and Logistics Assessments
  • Contract Language for DMSMS Support
  • Organic Services and Capabilities
  • Lead-Free Impacts on DMSMS Resolutions
  • DMSMS Management Planning
  • DMSMS Program Implementation
  • Parts Research, Monitoring, and Surveillance
  • Designing for Supportability
  • Software Obsolescence Considerations
  • DMSMS Program Infrastructure
  • Impact Assessments
  • Resolution Determination and Implementation
  • Developing workforce DMSMS competencies
  • DMSMS and Engineering Technical Reviews
  • DMSMS and Logistics Assessments
  • Contract Language for DMSMS Support
  • Organic Services and Capabilities
  • Lead-Free Impacts on DMSMS Resolutions

Early design influence focused on DMSMS strategies can drastically reduce the life cycle costs of a weapon system. As Defense technology become more complex, early influence on design becomes more important. Systems have a natural life cycle, an evolution, in which early analysis and prognostics can greatly affect sustainability costs. According to DOD officials, O&S costs constitute 60% to 80% of a weapon system’s total costs. Systems Engineering, Logistics, and other disciplines integrate to affect the systems’ product life cycle costs. Yet, there is significant room for improvement in the way design influence can affect new equipment and software design to reduce DMSMS cost impacts. This track will provide a forum for individuals to discuss processes, methods, best practices, lessons learned, case studies, and success stories related to Systems Engineering processes interaction with DMSMS methodologies. Possible topics for this track include but are not limited to:

  • Address innovative methods and practices to integrate System Engineering Processes within the DMSMS Management Strategy.
  • Exploration of the “cause and effect” relationships between design decisions and DMSMS related cost impact.
  • Discuss how applying DMSMS system supportability engineering methods, tools, and metrics can help to optimize elements of logistic support.
  • Discus the various points of intersection between RAM-C (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability - Cost) strategies and the DMSMS processes, and understanding the leverage opportunities and its effectiveness of DMSMS management programs.
  • Innovative techniques to address supportability issues pertaining to COTS-intensive systems through Systems Engineering practices leading to optimized design refresh planning efforts.
  • Discuss tools, techniques, and practices used to improve the design of a product to be more DMSMS resistant.

Escalating financial constraints makes life cycle optimization increasingly difficult. Product Support Managers (PSMs) face the challenge of implementing proactive, versus reactive, DMSMS Program methodologies throughout the Acquisition and Sustainment Lifecycle Phases. The goals and practices of DMSMS managers vary as a product passes through the Acquisition phase to the Sustainment phase. This track will provide a forum for individuals to discuss processes, methods, best practices, lessons learned, case studies, tools, and success stories related to DMSMS Management in Acquisition and Sustainment Phases. Possible topics for this track include but are not limited to:

  • Methodologies to determine the effectiveness of the DMSMS management programs.
  • Modeling methodologies developed to determine obsolescence impact from Acquisition decisions on Sustainment.
  • Understanding the connection between contracting strategies in different life cycle phases, and their impact on the effectiveness of a DMSMS program.
  • DMSMS forecasting, mitigations, and return on investment modeling to determine DMSMS Management effectiveness.
  • Discuss aspects of DMSMS management during lifecycle phases and to identify approaches, processes, tools, etc. that apply during each phase and how those practices differ.
The Defense Industrial base upon which the Department depends is always changing, through mergers and acquisitions, partnerships, bankruptcies, or strategic business decisions. In certain circumstances, these changes result in DMSMS occurrences for materials, components, parts or systems. One specific trait of Industrial Base DMSMS is the inability to properly predict the timing and resulting management options. For instance, company mergers and acquisition are kept confidential for securities and stock reasons, as are bankruptcies. In other situations, the present and future orders for a business line result in strategic decisions by companies to exit that portion their portfolio. What results are options that do not necessarily conform to the standard DMSMS solution set of end of life buys, redesign, or re-use. This DMSMS track is seeking abstracts which describe the magnitude of DMSMS caused by Industrial Base Changes, the type of advance notice that is typically available, whether standard DMSMS management tools contain these notifications, and the scope of potential DMSMS management options. Case studies are highly welcome.

 

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Critical Deadlines

Abstract Submission Aug 15
Abstract Notification Aug 29
Final Presentation Submitted Nov 7