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Agenda

2013 Proceedings

Monday, December 2, 2013
11:00 AM - 7:00 PM Registration
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM Concurrent Training Sessions
  • DMSMS Essentials for Newcomers Part 1
  • SD-22 Overview Part 1
  • DMSMS Plan Builder
  • DMSMS for the Program Manager
  • GIDEP and Suspect Counterfeits Reporting
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM Refreshment Break
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM Concurrent Training Sessions
  • DMSMS Essentials for Newcomers Part 2
  • SD-22 Overview Part 2
  • AS6171 Counterfeit Electronics Detection Test Techniques and Implementation Training
  • DMSMS for the Program Manager
  • Parts Management
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Welcome Reception (Exhibit Hall - Exhibits Open)

Poster Session
5:30 PM - 5:45 PM

Welcome
Ms. Elana Broitman, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Manufacturing & Industrial Base Policy, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology & Logistics)

Tuesday, December 3, 2013
7:00 AM - 7:00 PM Registration
7:00 AM - 8:00 AM Continental Breakfast (Outside General Session Ballroom)
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

DMC General Session (all attendees welcome)

12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Group Luncheon

1:30 PM - 2:00 PM

DMSMS Keynote (DMSMS General Session: all attendees welcome)
Mr. Stephen Welby, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Systems
Engineering

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

PANEL: DMSMS Issue Impacting Microwave Tubes Across Department of Defense

Moderator: Mr. K. Bryan Mitsdarffer, DOD Microwave Technologies Executive Agent, Naval Surface Warfare Center – Crane Division

Panelists:

  • Mr. Ken Wetzel, Deputy Director, OSD Title III Program Office
  • Mr. Edward Durell, DMSMS Air Staff Lead, SAF/AQRE, Pentagon, U.S. Air Force
  • Mr. Brad Botwin, Director, Industrial Base Studies, Office of Technology Evaluation, US Department of Commerce
  • Mr. Todd Leonhardt, Metallurgist, Director of Research & Development, Rhenium Alloys Inc.         

Description:
With the demise of the incandescent lighting market, the major domestic manufacturer of tungsten and tungsten 3% rhenium wire announced in early 2012 their intent to cease production at the end of the calendar year. The loss of this manufacturer was not immediately evident to the majority of the Department of Defense (DoD) Supply Chain as this manufacturer was a lower tier sub-vendor to the OEMs from whom DoD entities directly procure Microwave Tubes. The Panel will be comprised of Subject Matter experts across the DoD who have been involved with the topic and will discuss the complexity of the topic as an opportunity for the Conference Attendees to see the complexity of how DMSMS topics can impact DoD requirements and can take years to resolve.

Panel Members will cover the following subtopics:

  • The connection from wire sub-vendor to entrance into DoD systems as well as discuss the industrial requirements for high quality tungsten 3% rhenium wire used in helix traveling wave tubes and approximately 90% of all microwave tube heater assemblies has extremely stringent requirements.
  • The challenges to have supply chain visibility from End Item Procurements to Sub-Vendor Viability and the Complexity of supporting DMSMS requirements across DoD Services.
  • The Role of the Department of Commerce in tracking supply chain viability.
  • The Role of Office of the Secretary of Defense in Regards to Industrial Base Stability and Title III Applications.
3:30 PM - 4:00 PM Refreshment Break (Exhibit Hall)
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

PANEL: Counterfeit Parts Avoidance & Detection Standards

Moderator: Mr. Bruce Mahone, Director, Washington Operations, Aerospace, SAE International

Panelists:

  • Mr. Phil Zulueta, Consultant, Consultants to Management, SAE G-19CI Committee and the AS5553 Standard, “Fraudulent/Counterfeit Electronic Parts; Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition"
  • Mr. Phil Zulueta, Consultant, Consultants to Management, SAE G-19D Committee and the AS6081 Standard, “Fraudulent/ Counterfeit Electronic Parts: Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition – Independent Distribution”
  • Mr. Phil Zulueta, Consultant, Consultants to Management, SAE G-19T committee and the AIR6273 Aerospace Information Record, “Terms and Definitions - Fraudulent/Counterfeit Electronic Parts”
  • Mr. Sultan Lilani, Technical Support Manager, Integra Technologies, SAE G-19A Committee and the AS6171 Standard, “Test Methods Standard; General Requirements, Suspect/ Counterfeit Electrical, Electronic, and Electromechanical Parts”
  • Mr. Kevin Sink, Vice President Total Quality, TTI Inc, SAE G-19AD Committee and the AS6496 standard, “Fraudulent/Counterfeit Electronic Parts: Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition – Authorized/ Franchised Distribution”
  • Mr. Robert Tipton, Senior Analyst, Aerospace Systems Integrity, Wyle Aerospace Group, SAE G-21 Committee and the AS6174 Standard, “Counterfeit Materiel; Assuring Acquisition of Authentic and Conforming Materiel”
  • Ms. Kristal Snider, Vice President and Co-Founder, ERAI, SAE G-19DR Committee and the ARP6178 Aerospace Recommended Practice, “Fraudulent/Counterfeit Electronic Parts; Tool for Risk Assessment of Distributors”
  • Mr. Bill Scofield, Associate Technical Fellow, The Boeing Company, SAE G-19C Committee and the AS6462 Standard, “AS5553, Counterfeit Electronic Parts; Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition Verification Criteria” and AS6301 Standard, “Fraudulent/Counterfeit Electronic Parts: Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition – Independent Distribution Verification Criteria “
  • Mr. Bill Scofield, Associate Technical Fellow, The Boeing Company, TC-107 Committee and the IEC/TS 62668-1 Standard, “Process management for avionics - Counterfeit prevention - Part 1: Avoiding the use of counterfeit, fraudulent and recycled electronic components” & IEC/TS 62668-2 Standard, “Process management for avionics - Counterfeit prevention - Part 2: Managing electronic components from non-franchised sources”
  • Mr. Bill Scofield, Associate Technical Fellow, The Boeing Company, SAE APMC committee and the EIA-933 Standard, “Standard for Preparing a COTS Assembly Management Plan”
  • Mr. David Brown, Senior Principal Engineer, Product Fraud Countermeasures, Intel Corporation, SSM/1/-/1 Committee and the SemiT-20 committees and the ISO 16678 Standard, “Anti-counterfeiting tack and trace method using unique identifier numbering”
  • Ms. Debra Eggeman, Executive Director, Independent Distributors of Electronics Association(IDEA), IDEA Committee and the IDEA-STD-1010B Standard, “Acceptability of Electronic Components Distributed in the Open Market”
  • Mr. Mark Schaffer, iNEMI Project Manager, iNEMI project for “Assessment Methodology and Metric Development of Counterfeit Components”

Description:
Counterfeit parts prevention has been an emerging and important field to ensure reliability and mission success in support of the Warfighter and high-reliability applications. In the last several years, there have been numerous industry and government groups and committees developing policies and standards to address the emerging and persistent threat of counterfeiting. Understanding the landscape of industry standards that applies to the counterfeit avoidance and detection problem is complicated, even for the subject matter experts dedicated to the task of counterfeit parts prevention. The 2010 U.S. Department of Commerce Assessment of Counterfeit Electronics on the Defense Industrial Base demonstrated that no one is immune to the threat, and that all sectors of the supply chain have been impacted. Different sectors include Original Equipment Manufacturers and Integrators, Government Agencies, Authorized/Franchised Distribution, Brokers and Independent Distributors, Original Component Manufacturers, Test Laboratories, and COTS suppliers. Commodities include electronic parts, electronic assemblies, instruments, and materiel. In response to the threat, many of the sectors and different commodities have created standards to address the unique requirements necessary in their area to mitigate the problem. There are numerous committees and standards addressing different sectors of the supply chain and different commodities in an effort to control counterfeit parts.

The purpose of the panel is to assemble leads from the various standards committees who have created counterfeit parts avoidance and detection standards in an effort to have a better understanding of the landscape of committees and standards, and what their purpose is in addressing the problem. Each of the panelists will give a brief description of the scope, purpose, applicability, and which sector of the supply chain and commodities their standard applies. In addition, the panelists will provide a brief overview of the framework of their standard and what they are controlling with the requirements specified.

Audience members should have a better understand of the "alphabet soup" of committees and standards, and their relevance in addressing counterfeit parts avoidance and detection. Audience members can use this knowledge to assist them in creating and implementing robust counterfeit parts avoidance and detection systems that are relevant to their sector, and have an awareness of standards applicable to other sectors for flow-down purposes that will ultimately improve the reliability and mission success of their programs by better controlling the counterfeit parts problem.

There will be a separate technical session workshop following the panel for audience members to have direct interaction and Q&A with panelists.

5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Networking Reception (Exhibit Hall- Exhibits Open)

Poster Session

Wednesday, December 4, 2013
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Registration
7:00 AM - 8:00 AM Continental Breakfast (Outside General Session/Meeting Rooms)
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM Concurrent Technical and Training Sessions
  • Basic DMSMS Processes and Methodology - Software Obsolescence Solutions
  • Counterfeit Material - Detection and Testing
  • Counterfeit Material - Mitigation: Policies, Procedures and Metrics
  • DMSMS and Manufacturing Readiness Part 1
  • Parts Management - Technical Component Issues in Parts Management
9:30 AM - 9:45 AM Break (Outside General Session/Meeting Rooms)
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM Concurrent Technical and Training Sessions
  • Basic DMSMS Processes and Methodology - DMSMS Program Infrastructure
  • Basic DMSMS Processes and Methodology - DMSMS Program Tools
  • Counterfeit Parts Avoidance & Detection Standards Panel Questions & Answers Workshop
  • DMSMS and Manufacturing Readiness Part 2
  • Parts Management - Catalog and Risk Issues in Parts Management
11:15 AM - 12:00 PM

Networking Session (Exhibit Hall – First opening of hall for day)

Poster Session

12:15 PM - 1:30 PM Group Luncheon
"Innovation – Father of "Pit Stop" Engineering"
Speaker: Mr. Dennis Carlson, Carlson Technology
1:30 PM - 1:40 PM DOD DMSMS Program Remarks and Introduction of Speakers

Mr. Alex Melnikow, Director, DMSMS, Defense Standardization Program Office, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Systems Engineering

1:40 PM - 2:20 PM

PRESENTATION: Using Value Engineering (VE) to Improve DMSMS Management

Presenters:

  • Ms. Mary Hart, Program Manager, Value Engineering Program, Defense Logistics Agency
  • Dr. Jay Mandelbaum, Senior Researcher, Institute for Defense Analyses

Description:
VE is an analytical technique that identifies the functions of a product or process and identifies those functions that cost more than they are worth. Innovation occurs because of this unique approach to thinking about the problem at hand. VE has made significant contributions to affordability and Better Buying Power initiatives. VE can be applied to hardware and software; development, production, manufacturing; specifications, standards, contract requirements, other acquisition program documentation; and facilities and design and construction. It may be introduced at any point in the life-cycle of products, systems, projects or procedures. The use of VE provides better value for dollars spent, integrates creativity and innovation to problem solving, helps achieve a common understanding of key needs, and optimizes the current approach in seeking alternative ways to provide the required function. One purpose of this session is to explain VE’s unique approach to problem solving, discuss the VE methodology/use of function analysis, and provide examples of how it can identify innovative solutions to DMSMS problems.

A second purpose is to provide information about the use of contractor-generated Value Engineering Change Proposals (VECPs) to finance DMSMS resolutions. VECPs are voluntarily submitted by government contractors based on a clause required in all supplies and services contracts whose dollar value exceeds the simplified acquisition threshold of $100K. Only two basic conditions are required to submit a VECP – it change the contract and it save the government money. If the government accepts the VECP, the contractor is entitled to be reimbursed for its expenses out of the savings and then share the remaining savings with the government. From a DMSMS perspective, the contractor expenses could be the non-recurring cost associated with implementing a resolution.

As a result of this session, audience members will have a better understanding of the VE methodology and how this tool may be used to assist them with obsolescence issues or other problems.

2:20 PM - 3:00 PM

PRESENTATION: DMSMS and Manufacturing Readiness

Presenters:

  • Mr. Walt Tomczykowski, President - Tomczykowski Group LLC
  • Mr. Michael Galluzzi, Principal Investigator Prime Supplier, NASA

Description:
The lack of DMSMS mitigation strategies will impact Producibility and Manufacturing Readiness. Manufacturing Readiness Assessments (MRAs) examine 9 areas or “threads” and 22 sub-threads which outline risk areas in manufacturing (dodmrl.org). These areas include Technology and Industrial Base, Design, Cost and Funding, Materials, Process Capability and Control, Quality Management, Manufacturing Workforce, Facilities, and Manufacturing Management.

In July 2012 the Manufacturing Readiness matrix was updated to include additional guidance for DMSMS risk mitigation, identification of obsolescence issues, and planning for supply chain management. This panel will address topics related to supply chain risks that impact producibility and manufacturing readiness, as well as new and innovative approaches to system design that would reduce adverse impacts of obsolescence, and new manufacturing methods that create obsolete parts, and sustainment intended to reduce adverse impacts.

The purpose of the panel is to assemble subject matter experts that understand how DMSMS and obsolescence affects producibility and manufacturing readiness (MR). Each of the panelists will give a brief description of the impacts of DMSMS on producibility and MR, and which sector of the supply chain and commodities their experiences applies. Areas that will be addressed are Materials, Technology and industrial base, and Manufacturing Management and Material planning. In addition, the moderator will provide a brief overview of the MR Matrix highlighting the areas that address obsolescence, DMSMS, and supply chain management.

Audience members should have a better understand of the how the first “M” in DMSMS impacts manufacturing readiness and producibility. Audience members can use this knowledge to assist them in mitigating producibility and manufacturing risks caused by DMSMS.

There will be a separate technical session workshop following the panel for audience members to have direct interaction and Q&A with panelists.

3:00 PM - 3:30 PM Afternoon Break (Exhibit Hall)
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

PANEL: Strategic Materials

Moderator: Mr. Michael Steurer, Program Analyst, Defense
Logistics Agency (DLA) Strategic Materials

Panelists:

  • Mr. Gary Gulino, Projects Administrator, DLA Strategic Materials, The 21st Century NDS Process
  • Mr. Adam Carroll, Project Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, SMART System Program Development
  • Mr. Jeff Green, President, J. A. Green & Company, Industrial & Congressional Climate Related to Critical Materials
  • Mr. Tracy Daubenspeck, Operations Lead Analyst, Naval Underwater Warfare Center Division Keyport, Applying SMART to DMSMS Management

Description:
The Strategic and Critical Materials Stock Piling Act (50 U.S.C. 98 et seq) requires: "materials that (A) would be needed to supply the military, industrial, and essential civilian needs of the United States during a national emergency, and (B) are not found or produced in the United States in sufficient quantities to meet such need." As the operational arm of the Defense National Stockpile (NDS), Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Strategic Materials must continually analyze material(s) supply chain(s) and the associated industrial capabilities.

DLA Strategic Materials, through Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has developed a system to improve the analysis process and promote inter-governmental agency participation and collaboration. The Strategic Material Analysis & Reporting Topography (SMART) system. Topography with the following definition: A description or an analysis of a structured entity, showing the relations among its components: In the topography of the economy, several depressed areas are revealed, ties directly to the system capability to "map" and visually represent material supply chains.

The panel members will discuss the need, development, evaluation, and implementation of SMART. The specific components and capabilities of SMART. The need to develop and improve domestic industrial capabilities will also be discussed. This panel will address both Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages.

There will be a SMART demonstration available at the DLA Strategic Materials display in the DMC/DMSMS exhibit hall.

4:00 PM Exhibit Hall Closes (Exhibit teardown begins)
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

DOD DMSMS Working Group Town Hall

Presenters:

  • Various Members of the DOD DMSMS Working Group
Thursday, December 5, 2013
7:00 AM - 11:30 AM Registration
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM Exhibit Hall Closed (Exhibit teardown continues)
8:00 AM - 8:30 AM Group Breakfast
8:30 AM - 9:00 AM Warfighter Perspective
Maj Gen John J. Broadmeadow, USMC, Commanding General, Marine Corps Logistics Command (Invited)
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Concurrent Technical and Training Sessions
  • Basic DMSMS Processes and Methodology - DMSMS Management and Design
  • Basic DMSMS Processes and Methodology - Raw Materials
  • Counterfeit Material - Prevention
  • Parts Management - Parts Management Focus on Obsolescence Solutions
  • Counterfeit Material - Advanced Detection, Testing and Tracking
10:30 AM - 10:45 AM Break (Outside General Session/Meeting Rooms)
10:45 AM - 12:15 PM Concurrent Technical and Training Sessions
  • Basic DMSMS Processes and Methodology - DMSMS Program Implementation
  • Basic DMSMS Processes and Methodology - Lifecycle Mitigations
  • Counterfeit Material - CHASE Advanced Technologies for Counterfeit Detection and Avoidance
  • Counterfeit Material - Concepts and Framework
  • Training: GIDEP & Suspect Counterfeit Reporting
12:15 PM DMSMS Adjourned